What does it mean, to go to LTC?

Moving to LTC

Tonight I had a sweet experience. I met with a group of people specializing in gerontology. Most were nurses, some were Resident Care Assistants, and we were fortunate to have a Social Worker in our midst. In the group were a few leaders who have led the way and set a great example to follow. Their commitment to excellent care for our seniors is and always has been evident in their work. In the group there were many nurses and caregivers that I had not met before. The group oozed with enthusiasm for their work. I learned a lot from these people about LTC.

No-one leaves LTC to move elsewhere

I reflected on the fact that almost 100% of people who go to live in a long term care (LTC) facility will die in that facility unless they transfer to another facility. Very few return to independent living. In BC, the length of stay in LTC has decreased due to shortage of beds and an attempt to keep people in the homes as long as possible. Residents are admitted to LTC with more complex issues. This work is big, this work is complex. This work is challenging.

A Palliative Approach

I reflect on the concept of a hospice palliative approach, and the need to address end of life issues from time of admission to LTC onward. Palliative Care Australia suggests that,

 … 65% of the dying do not need the services of a specialty hospice palliative care service, but can be cared for well with the skills of primary care team.

I agree, that many of our dying can be cared for beautifully in the LTC facilities. But adequate funds are necessary to provide this care!

My heart goes out to this team of people who work hard and do so much with so few resources. I wish them the best, and salute them for the great work of care giving that they do!

Way to go!

Warm regards,

Kath

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