A reflection by Maureen Russell

Today I met with a wonderful group of Health Care Assistant students from Capilano University. In preparation for the time together they sent me a list of questions, and I in turn considered the questions and what I might share. I shared with them a reflection written by Maureen Russell, a psychosocial care provider who lives and works in southern Ontario.
This reflection was inspired by a man whose experience with a Personal Support Worker helped him to trust, to open up, and prepared him to eventually be able to meet with Maureen in the last weeks of his life. Maureen was adamant, that without the work of the PSW the man never would have been able to open up with her and address some of the deeper issues that he carried.

Reflection—Undressed 

You entered, and my heart sank. Today would be the first day I would allow a stranger to bathe my broken body. 

How could I have come to this…this moment of unwanted dependency? 

I cringe with despair. A tear dares to sneak its way from beneath the mask of courage I so sheepishly hide behind. 

Who are you, Stranger? Who are you they send to enter my intimate space? 

Do you know ME? Do you know who I am? 

How do I let go into your hands, that which has only been felt by the gentleness of my mother’s touch oh so long ago? 

I shudder as you draw near. My decrepit body tenses and my stomach churns. I close my eyes and turn away, anticipating your cold and callous touch. 

I wait…I wait… 

Till broken is the air by your slow and soft voice…“This must be difficult for you. How can we best do this together?” 

How     can       we       best     do        this            together?  you asked…. 

Breath releases, body relaxes and my facade of courage slips.  Tears flow. I let go. And the waltz begins… 

In the weeks and months to come, we danced every day as you cleaned and cared for my declining body with the utmost respect and compassion. 

Within this place of “the intimate” that I so desperately feared had morphed a space of trust. I felt safe to wonder aloud with you…“How will I die?” “Have I mattered?” “How will I be remembered?” “What is the purpose of it all?”  

You quietly listened without judgement or a need to fix…For that, I thank you.  

And then, you offered me another partner, a counsellor, who could take these new steps and dance the dance of purpose and meaning with me. And because of you, I could accept her help.

I could let go of my masks and facades and bare my true self on my last waltz. 

Little did I know when you entered that being undressed would allow me to be naked.  

Deep gratitude to YOU who cared for my body and gave space for my spirit.   

Contributed by Maureen Russell 

Thank you Maureen for sharing this wonderful reflection with us!

How do you infuse love in your organization?

Several years ago I was inspired as I read writings from Stephen Post and Thomas Kitwood defining love in dementia care.

“Love within the context of dementia care includes comfort in the original sense of tenderness, closeness, the calming of anxiety and bonding.” (Kitwood, 2003)

“Altruistic love involves both a judgement of worth, and a related affirmative affection. Love is manifest in care, which is love in response to the other in need; it is manifest in compassion, which is love in response to the other in suffering; it is manifest in companionship, which is love attentively present with the other in ordinary moments.” (Post 2003)

As I reflected on their writings, I thought of my esteemed colleague Misha Butot – Fourteen years after graduating as a social worker, while working as a counsellor, educator and yoga teacher, she recognized that love was a theme in all of her work. As a masters student Misha approached people across Western Canada who were involved in social justice work. She asked them if love was relevant in their work and what love in professional practice looked like for them. Even though they were diverse in age, gender, work and focus, ten common themes emerged. Fourteen years later, I approached Misha and asked if we could revisit those themes and translate them into plain English.

As we worked on this “translation” we were inspired by the stories from the research participants, we reflected on our own lives and we wrote a personal commitment to love in our professional practice.

This year, as we consider the most important theme of cultural safety in health care, I am inspired by the thoughts of Dr. James Makokis, an indigenous physician, “Racism is hate. The opposite of hate is love.” and he asks, “How will you infuse love into your organization?”

Racism is hate. The opposite of hate is love.” and he asks, “How will you infuse love into your organization?

Dr James Makokis

In this month of February, as many celebrate Valentine’s Day, love and friendship, I invite you to consider:

What does love look like in your practice?

How do you infuse love into your organization?

I’d love to hear your thoughts.

And a time to cry….

 

I wrote this reflection on Jan 31 ,2020, a year and a week after our son Geordie died,

At this one year mark, I #GIVETHANKS for family, friends and colleagues who supported and encouraged us, buoyed us up, laughed and cried with us, mourned with us, and comforted us. They are all excellent examples of #CompassionateCommunities and of #Griefliteracy. 

As I look back on this year, I consider that this year was a time to cry ( #TIMETOCRY ) – this was a year of sorrow. I allowed myself to feel it, embrace it, go with the flow – go with the flood of tears. This first year was my time to cry. There were times when I did not cry, and there were times when tears came frequently and in abundance. And there were times when I laughed and cried at the same time.

I like the idea that tears wash out toxic waste – that must make me pretty clean!!

The metaphor of helping large physical wounds to heal can help us understand ways to support a person to heal following loss.

The healing of large open wounds (for example pressure sores caused by lying in one position for too long) can be facilitated by:

  • allowing the open wound to heal from the base up (vs trying to suture the edges together as one would with an incision),
  • permitting the serous fluids produced at the site to moisten the wound bed,
  • providing the person with good nutrition, and
  • positioning the person to avoid direct pressure on or near the wound.

Grief is a whole person, natural process by which a person adapts to life without the person/object that has been lost.  Grief is the healing process. Like wounds, grief may be supported by:

  • allowing the wound caused by the loss to remain open, to not try to cover it up, suture it up, and fix it quickly. In other words, allowing the wound to heal from the inside out.
  • allowing sorrow to be felt and experienced and allowing tears to flow. Perhaps tears also provide nourishment to our soul.
  • providing good nutrition – providing healthy food, casseroles, salad, nourishing drinks support the griever to do the work of grieving,
  • permitting, encouraging time away, away from work, away from major stresses (compassionate leave) and decreases pressure on the whole person supporting healing.

Being open to the sorrow, permitting tears to flow, striving to eat (or provide) healthy foods, have all helped this year in healing my wounds, in grieving my loss.

Moving into year two

And now… As I move into year two from Geordie’s death…On a head level I am hoping that I will cry less and feel less sorrow in the coming months. (A counsellor smiled when I said this and suggested to me that that might not be possible. That I may not have control over that sorrow :)) But, I would like to give it a try. (Perhaps you, like the counsellor are thinking, “Well good luck with that Kath! You do not get to choose!”)

In scriptures there are references to learning that happens “in your heart and in your mind.” I sometimes joke that “my head got the memo that Geordie is just fine in this place of life after death but my heart did not yet receive the memo – hence the tears”. So, perhaps this year, I will see about helping my heart get the memo.

My plan of the moment is this: When I am talking or reflecting and find myself starting to cry, then I will ask myself if this conversation or this reflection is helpful and if I want to “go there”. I will ask myself if I want to cry or if another road might work better for me in that moment. If I want to take a different road, I will breathe deep, change my tone, speak from my head and not my heart, and continue with that conversation…. OR …. I will suggest that we change the topic or change the reflection.

One week into this plan I am finding that asking myself these questions is giving me options, and allow me an escape from the ongoing sorrow.

In defense of tears…. I need to be very clear…

It is not that I think that crying is bad, or that tears are bad! Not at all!! As I mentioned above, tears can help provide moisture and nourishment. And I am queen of crying! It is just that crying can feel soooo exhausting. And sorrow is so sad…. and for a while I would like to try something else. Geordie was all about living fully, and facing life head on. So, in the coming weeks/months I will just remember that I may have a choice to cry or not to cry, to talk or not to talk, to reflect or not to reflect…. and can chose what would be the best for me at that time.

I #GIVETHANKS for friends and family who have permitted me to cry as much as I like over this past year and they encourage me to continue to cry as long as I need/want to.

I #GIVETHANKS for those who have expressed appreciation for my sharing of my grief and have allowed me to be open in my grief. 

This posting today, is one step in this journey. And tomorrow I may be writing again about the benefits of tears, and a year from now I may write that my second year after Geordie’s death was just as sad as my first….and you my friends and colleagues will get to witness that grief has it’s own timeline…

All the best to each of you in grieving, learning, loving and living. May you be supported in #compassionatecommunities. #griefliteracy.

Hugs from a virtual distance – with hopes for more hugs in person by the end of 2021!

Kath